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Phone and Video Interviewing

Phone and Video Interviewing


Hello everyone! Thank you for joining us
today and welcome to our webinar presentation discussing Video and Phone
Interviewing. If this is your first webinar, welcome, and I would like to
quickly introduce myself. My name is Amanda Hente and I am the Alumni
Professional Development Coordinator here at Saint Louis University. I started
my role in July of 2015 and since then, I have been working on establishing and
strengthening alumni professional development programming and this webinar
series is a part of that initiative. So now, I would like to quickly introduce
our speaker today Ahmar Ursani. Ahmar is one of our Career Counselors here at SLU and
he will be our speaker today. Welcome, Ahmar… Thank you so much Amanda a pleasure to
be here today to talk to you about video and phone interviewing. So let’s go ahead
and get started. Just a little bit about myself I’m a Career Counselor here at
Saint Louis University. My background is in Social Work and psychology. I’ve been in
this University since 2015 and in this certain position since May of 2019. So let’s go ahead and talk a little bit about our topic today. So we’ll start by
talking about the purpose of interviewing. The main purpose of an
interview is to show enthusiasm, knowledge, and competence towards the
position that you’re applying for. It is your first opportunity to show an
employer that you can communicate effectively and that you’re a generally
nice human being who’s pleasant to be around which is as important as being
competent in your profession. You prepare for this interview by practicing your responses to answers presenting yourself professionally and doing yourself a
favor and researching the company before the actual interview starts. You can do
this by going to the company’s website, reading about programs that they’re
having, reading a little bit more about their organizational structure, for
example. So the first thing to do before an interview even starts is to prepare
for questions. So make it clear that you are in this position for a reason. Relate specific experiences and credentials to
the job description; so experiences that you’ve had in the past that relate to
that actual job description build those anecdotes. I always tell my students you
should have 10 to 12 anecdotes ready to talk about the various points of your of
your resume that you want to discuss but don’t avoid a chronological
biography of yourself you want to make sure that you’re hitting high points of
your professional development and journey. And make sure you know yourself
go through your resume and line by line and think about stories that these
resume bullet points can pull from. You want to include stories about times that
you’ve struggled with a certain project how did you overcome that that’s
struggle you can talk a little bit about conflicts that you’ve resolved
opportunities that you’ve been on in a team setting that you helped leverage
your skills to make sure that team was ready for the next step in that
professional development journey. So what questions will employers ask you know as
you can see on this slide there’s a few questions here we never know exactly
what an employer is going to ask so what we should really do beforehand is
prepare our anecdotes. So the one way that you can prepare anecdotes connects
to your learning style. So for example, I am a visual learner and I like to make
timelines, word clouds, charts, explaining my anecdotes. Stories and interviewing is
all about being able to tell a concise narrative eloquently and professionally.
In order for me to do that, I want to connect to my learning style and create
these visual clouds to make sure that I know that my story has a beginning, a
middle, and an end. And one way to organize that behavioral type of
question is through a formatting technique called CAR. So you’ll see that
on the right hand side it asks you to give a circumstance overview that’s
basically giving a background of your story. The action is what specific tasks
did you do to accomplish a certain goal that you were assigned
and within a workplace, and then the result. What did you accomplish? So that
structural framework will help you organize and visualize your anecdotes
that you’ll be building for your employers. Now just a few before and
during interview and video tips here So for phone and videos so before the
interview make sure that you have a voicemail mailbox reading set up in case
you miss a call. You want to make sure that if you are interviewing through
Skype or any other online platform that you have photo attached to that account
you want to make sure your screen name and background for the video interviews
are work appropriate. So make sure you find a quiet place with a few audio or
visual distractions. If you’re on a phone interview, you want to make sure you have
a strong cell signal. If you are on a video interview, you want to make sure
that you have a good Wi-Fi connection. Sometimes when you’re doing phone and
video interviews, you might be in a different time zone than your employer
so do double-check that you are getting the timezone correct and make those
adjustments accordingly. The great thing about phone interviews is you can have
materials with you. So keep a copy of your resume nearby if you have
references keep that that nearby as well but don’t read from your references or
your resume or don’t read anything that’s scripted because you’re not gonna
seem and appear to be authentic you’re gonna appear to be more so robotic.
During the interview make sure you’re paying attention to your tone and your
volume. You want to make sure you do that more it’s more important via the phone
or via video interview because you’re expressing your enthusiasm
electronically or through the telephone wires so you want to make sure your tone
and your volume enunciates and really shows your enthusiasm for the actual position. Make sure to avoid umms and ahhs likes, you knows, those
fillers are gonna be even more apparent in video and phone interviews so you
want to avoid that as much as possible. You can have some cheat sheets with
you as well especially for a phone. For a video interview, that’s a little bit more
complicated because you’ll have a web view you’ll be looking directly at a
webcam however if you want to keep a post-it note nearby your computer feel
free to do that as well. So let’s talk specifically about phone interviews
again. Once again, and I’m re-emphasizing this-logistics. You want to make sure you have the right
date the right phone number the right time and especially when it comes to
that time zone because you don’t want to have that embarrassing moment where you
show up an hour late to a phone interview. Dress professionally. And I
know this is over the phone, but dressing professionally helps you get into the
mindset of, “This is a professional interview, I need to take it as seriously
as if I was walking into the headquarters of this organization.”
Posture is incredibly important for interviews as well. You want to sit up
straight as if you are speaking to someone in person. That sitting up
straight and having good posture will help you enunciate and deliver your
stories and your lines professionally. We talked a little bit about cheat sheets
you can use those but please remember you shouldn’t be reading off of cheat
sheets they should just be one or two words here and there to help you
remember the main points of a certain story that you want to tell. And the
importance of enunciation is incredibly important during phone interviews you
want to make sure you don’t sound dull. It’s very easy to sound dull during an
interview especially on a phone. So make sure that you are smiling while you’re
talking over the phone. Make sure you’re transmitting that enthusiasm through. If
you’re a person who speaks with their hands, I’m doing this right now, I’m
speaking with my hands because it helps me enunciate- it helps me show that
enthusiasm towards that employer and by the way these general
tips are adapted from a great book that I really love it’s called, “The New Rules of Work.” It’s a modern playbook for navigating your careers by Alexandra
Cavoulacos and Kathryn Minshew. All right, let’s go ahead and talk a little bit more about video interviews. So with video
interviews, lighting and camera angles that are flattering and a setting that
is uncluttered is incredibly important. You want to make sure that if you’re
doing a video interview that the employer can actually see your face
properly. You also want to make sure that you test your technology beforehand. Make
sure that if you have a a certain Wi-Fi connection that it can be spotty that
that is not where you’re sitting and doing this video interview. You want to
make sure the Wi-Fi is strong and for example we actually have video
interviewing rooms within our new career services suite. So if you want to request
our room to do a phone and video interview I’ll give you directions
towards the end on how to do that. You want to make sure your Skype
username is work appropriate. You don’t want to have something that’s
inappropriate because that’s gonna immediately off the bat send a negative
signal to your employer. If your sound quality is not great, please use headphones or headsets. And if you are unsure how to get that equipment, you can always find them at Amazon for pretty affordable. And
once again professional dress is incredibly important here. You should
dress just like you were going to an interview in a headquarters make sure
that you’re looking straight into the camera. That’s your laptop’s camera, and not on your computer and looking down. if you need that cheat sheet, make sure that it is a sticky note version
during a video interview because if you’re looking at a cheat sheet, you’re
constantly looking down which is not a good sign for a video
interview. Make sure you don’t have any other windows open on your computer; an
instant message ding, a Google Chat ding, can be very distracting. And smile and use
your natural body language. You should treat this just as a face to
face interview. So a new phase in interviewing is called pre-recorded
interviews. A pre-recorded interview or sometimes we call it a one-way interview or a new job search interview
process. So basically you’re given questions and you record yourself
responding to those questions. And then you send that recorded message
back to your employer. Sometimes you get the questions beforehand, sometimes you
get to practice and do a dry run of these interview questions and you may
even try recording yourself with that limit. If so, if you’re given five
questions and you have two minutes to answer them, make sure you give yourself
a dry run so you know how to pace yourself during that pre-recorded
interview. And make sure that even though these pre-recorded interviews can be
awkward, make sure that you appear as natural as you can and show your
enthusiasm for that position. Sometimes you have multiple attempts to
do these pre-recorded interviews, so that’s why practicing beforehand is
going to be incredibly important; building those narratives are going to
be incredibly important. So now that you’ve made it through the interview, one
of the big things that may be asked you and probably 100% will be asked is, “Do
you have any questions for me?” and the answer is always and enthusiastically
always yes. You should develop at least three to five questions you can ask the
interviewer. Even though you’re probably gonna only have time for a few. You
always want to develop questions that relate to the position. So that research
that you did beforehand, researching the company, making sure that you looked at
their website, program details, develop questions from there to ask the
interviewer at the end of your interview. That shows professionalism
and it also shows that you’ve engaged in that research process. You always want to
thank the interviewer. Make sure that you have their contact information so you
can follow-up within 24 to 48 hours after the interview. You do not want to
send a thank-you email right after that interview ends. That’s showing the
employer that you didn’t give yourself time to think and process
through that interview. It’s not only polite, but this will make them consider
you again. That message that you send thanking them will be like, “Oh I remember
Ahmar! He interviewed really well, and I really liked this certain point
that he brought up. I’m gonna make sure to tell that to the hiring manager.” Other
candidates will send thank-you notes and don’t give them the
competitive advantage by not sending a thank-you note. So remember in the
note, you reiterate your interests, you thank them again. If you forgot to
share any information during the interview, you want to share that information now
and you want to provide additional materials that you may have offered. So a
question that we get asked a lot is, “Should this thank-you letter be written
or via email?” A hundred percent, that is your call. There is no good or bad
thing about electronic or written notes. For me I like to send written
notes because it’s a lost art form and I feel that it is important to send
written notes. However, an email is just as valuable. The important thing here is
that you are sending a thank-you. Now all of this can seem overwhelming and can
seem a little daunting so know that we are here for you. Alumni have career
services for the rest of their lives, you’re forever Billikins. So the best way
to get ready for these interviews is by practicing. It helps you get rid of those
nerves, it helps us talk about how to build
those anecdotes that we want to talk about during an interview. You can meet
with me one-on-one or in person we actually have a interview application
called Interview Stream on Handshake and that is a great way for you to practice
how to record yourself and really emphasize, “Oh, I do use a lot of filler
words, how can I work on that? Oh, I’m really struggling with giving responses
in two minutes.” This is an application which you can find on Handshake to help you practice. Interview Stream it records you so you
can watch yourself being interviewed and you can also hear yourself. So
it’s a great application. I highly recommend that you use it. And if you are
signing up for a mock interview I’ll likely send you a message asking you
about details for that position so we can develop personalized questions for
you. Just know that we’re here to help you can make an appointment by calling
our number 314-977-2828 and we also have walk-in resume reviews Monday through Friday from 1:00 p.m.- 2:00 p.m. There’s a 10-15 minute review of your actual resume. We’re located in Griesedieck Hall we just moved this fall semester we’re in Suite 120 right at the ground
level of Griesedieck Hall and our social media platforms are here as well so
please follow us on social media for updated news and my email address is
right here and feel free to call or email me for any future guidance. Thank
you so much for listening today and I look forward to seeing you. Thank you for
tuning in everyone and thank you Ahmar for your presentation and helpful
information. We hope you can join us for future presentations and everybody have
a great day!

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