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Subject and Call Number Searching

Subject and Call Number Searching


This video explains how subject and call number
searching work in GreenGlass. GreenGlass supports classification of materials
using the Library of Congress and Dewey Decimal Classification Systems. We rely on library call numbers to assign
these classes. If the library cannot supply a valid LC or
Dewey Call Number, we will use a WorldCat call number if one is available. If we are unable to class a title in LC or
Dewey, it will receive a “no data” designation for these attributes. Here is an example of a title that was classed
in LC. But looking at the call number, we are able
to give the title an LC class and an LC subclass. We are also able to place the call number
in a numeric range that represents a further subdivision within the LC classification scheme. To search for items by LC class in Query Builder,
go to the “Subjects” area and select specific LC classes as an option. You may select multiple classes with the results
showing in the “Results” pane. Alternately, you can drill down into a specific
class and then select one or more subclasses. For projects completed after October 2018,
LC and Dewey range searching is available. Clicking on a subclass will make the “Add
Subject Range” option visible. Clicking on this option will open up two boxes
into which you can enter the beginning and ending numbers of a call number range. This range within the DA subclass represents
the history of Wales. To enter another numeric range, I can click
on the “Additional Subject Range” option. This range represents the history of Scotland. So here I defined two ranges that represent
the history of Wales and the history of Scotland respectively. I can remove ranges by clicking on the trash
can icon. It is also possible to enter values with a
decimal and trailing numbers such as this. Note that if the number in the start range
box defines all the titles I am interested in, I can leave the end range box blank. To identify titles that have not been classed
in LC, scroll down the list of LC classes and select the last option which is “No
Data”. For many libraries, this number will be zero
or very low. But if a library is large, uses other classification
schemes or includes special collections, this number may be significant. Note that these call numbers are not valid
LC call numbers. For libraries with Dewey classified titles,
the same functionality applies for selecting classes, for selecting subclasses and for
searching on specific numeric ranges. In cases where we have significant numbers
of titles without a valid LC or Dewey call number, we need another option. Call number pattern searching is a new feature
available for projects whose data was processed after March 2018. It is useful for retrieving items whose call
numbers reflect classification schemes other than LC and Dewey and also for retrieving
items whose call numbers contain prefixes, suffixes or annotations of interest such as
format designations or collection names. Here are some examples of non-standard call
numbers and patterns of interest within them. In the first case, we see there’s a suffix,
which identifies that item as being a Canadian government document; in the second case of
prefix which identifies a subject in a local classification scheme; in the third case of
prefix which identifies this as a collection and the fourth case in which a prefix identifies
this as a material type. The call number search feature is a pattern
match feature, which allows you to look for a pattern at the beginning of a call number,
somewhere within a call number or at the end of the call number. To find the Canadian government documents
in the example given, we will search for call numbers which contain the given string. We see in the results where the match was
in the call number. In this example, we are searching for items
that are marked as “pamphlets” in the call number. First, we will look for call numbers that
begin with the word “pamphlet”. If we scroll down, these are the results we
will see. Then if we broaden our search to find call
numbers where the word “pamphlet” appears anywhere in the call number, not just in the
beginning of the call number, we will see these results. We can search for other call number strings
as well, in this case for the word “folio”. We can remove these string searches as well. To summarize, use the subject searching menu
to search for LC and Dewey class library materials and use the call numbers option to search
for non-LC and non-Dewey materials and to search for call number prefixes, suffixes
and annotations.

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