Articles Blog

Supporting the Internship and Job Search

Supporting the Internship and Job Search


Good afternoon everyone.
Thank you so much for joining us for our job and internship search
webinar. Before we get started, I just want to make sure that you all can hear me.
If you could respond in the text box to let me know if you can hear me.
Alright, it looks like we’re good to go.
So let’s go ahead and get started. My name is Angela Pontious. I am an assistant
director in the Center for Career Exploration and Success and we are
excited to present this job and internship search webinar to you today.
If you have any questions as we are moving forward, feel free to go ahead and
type your question in that chat box and we can answer those as we go along. So a brief overview of what we have to
offer here in the Career Center. First, our programs and workshops. You can see all
of these that we have to offer on our website which is just MiamiOH.edu/careers.
We have many different programs and workshops to offer for our
students. Some of our most popular would be our basic interviewing skills
workshop. This is an opportunity for students to learn about all of the
preparations the research, the type of questions, how to close an interview, and
then follow up. It’s a great introduction to what an interview is comprised of and
so we actually do require that of students who want to participate in our
mock interview program or on-campus interviewing. We also, of course, have
resume and LinkedIn critiques that students will take advantage of, and that
also kind of goes into our reviews as well. So we have career assistants in our
office, and these are students who have been trained by our Career Center staff
to go over those resumes and LinkedIn profiles, some cover letters, to give the
student some general information about how a resume should be organized;
perhaps what sections to include, or on LinkedIn, how does that also incorporate
resume material. So LinkedIn and resumes are slightly different and those
students have been trained on both of those. Your students can come down to
our office anytime and do what we call drop-in hours and I’ll have some more
information about that in the next few slides. We also have a lot of
opportunities for experiential learning and in the past we’ve had what we call
career treks. These treks take students to nearby cities, and in the
past that included San Francisco and Washington DC and Cincinnati. And this
year we’re looking at Detroit and Atlanta and Chicago. We’ll
have information on our website about those treks soon. And essentially those
treks take students one to two days to really experience what it is to be in a
specific career industry, to know what it’s like to be in that industry for a
day. We make a lot of connections, do a lot of networking. It’s a great
opportunity if a student has a desire to go to that particular city or just wants
to see what a career could look like in a specific field. We also offer a lot of
job shadow opportunities, which are typically just a one-day experience. Last
January we took students to Columbus, Dayton, and Cincinnati, an easy day trip,
to experience different industries. We went to Mercy Health. We were at WorldPay.
Just gives students an opportunity again to meet with Miami alumni and also
professionals and industries that they were interested in. We also partner with
the study abroad and study away trips, and so coming up, actually also in
January, we are partnering with the StratComm program called Inside Chicago.
I’ll be taking a mini trek up there. And then, also the College of Creative Arts,
the fashion program, will be going to New York City. And so there’s a couple of
different ways to participate in those study abroad and away trips, as well. Of
course, we have our Career Coaching. Each division, each college has their own
career advisors in our center. So, for example, I am the liaison to the College
of Creative Arts, and so I work with all of those students. And so we have an
advisor for each one of those divisions and colleges, so your students can make
appointments with us for individualized career coaching. We also have our Mock
Interview program. It is a wonderful program that is coordinated
with a professional here in our office and with our student mock interviewers.
And your students can set up an appointment to do a mock interview. The
whole experience is about 60 minutes. The first 30 minutes is a 30 minute
interview, and it can be industry- specific. It can also be recorded so the
students can reflect on it later, but then there’s also a 30 minute debrief
about that interview and helpful suggestions on how the student could
improve their interview experience. And then, lastly, our career fairs. And so we
just had our fall career fair about a month ago and we also recently had SCENE
which is for our sports careers. And so that happened actually just a couple
weeks ago. We have a lot of different employers that come up throughout the year.
Coming up next would be our architecture and design fair, happening on December
10th. We also have our spring career fair, which would be on February 21st. We have
a lot of other expos and networking nights that also come up as well. And all
of those events, including all of our other programs and workshops and
everything you see here, will be on our website. So here is a great picture of a
timeline or a cycle of how things work here in the career fair. Our first major
event is our fall career fair and students who are coming to this event
are looking for internships and jobs. And that happens early on and early on there
is a push for some majors to lock those in in the fall, but for other majors it
doesn’t happen until later. But after that fall career fair, then we’re looking
into fall recruiting and what we call on-campus interviews. And so prep for
that would be your resume, cover letters, and doing an interview. All of those
things that we offer here in our office to help students prepare for that fall
recruiting and on-campus interviews. All information regarding jobs and internships
are available on Handshake, which is our job board and it’s the way that
the Career Center can communicate with students in during on-campus interviews.
We have employers come to our office. We have a suite of interview rooms and we
allow employers to come on campus and do interviews here with our students. This
is great that students don’t have to leave campus. They don’t have to try and
do it when they’re on fall break or Thanksgiving break. This is an
opportunity for them to just take an hour or so out of their day to be able
to interview for an internship or a full-time position. And then after we go
through the fall recruiting cycle, coming up in February we then have our spring
career fair. Again, jobs and internships available there. Both fairs have
anywhere from 250 to 300 employers that come to campus in a wide variety of
industries, so all students can participate in both of our career fairs.
And a majority of our employers do hire multiple majors, so even if your student
is thinking that the Career Fair may not be for them, there is likely going to be
an opportunity for them to engage with an employer while they’re there. Of
course here in the Career Center, we would continue to help students prepare
as they’re getting ready for either Fair and going into fall or spring recruiting.
It happens both semesters very similar in the way things are set up. But one
thing that we do want to make sure that students know is that it is important
for them to do research about who’s coming to the fair, who is going to be
doing fall recruiting on campus. And so it’s really important for those students
to know who they want to talk to and to learn about those. And again, just to
reiterate, that not all majors require or need an internship, so that would be
something that students should talk to faculty and their academic advisors
about. Of course, a lot of skills can be gained through an internship, but that
can also be gained through other means of summer employment
or an on-campus job or something to that extent. And again, looking at this
timeline to know that not all majors are on the same hiring schedule. A lot of
business students or engineering students might be looking at getting a
full-time job from the fall career fair. However our teachers, our creatives, and
some of our other majors will be looking during the spring career fair. So here are the offer acceptance
policies, and these are on our website; both the Career Center website and the
Farmer School of Business website. This is really important for students to know
when they are interviewing and have been offered a position. So anything through
the Career Center, the offer must be remain… must remain open for three
weeks. So from the date of the offers, being made three weeks after that, the
students have the opportunity to decide if they want to accept or decline that
offer. This does give the students the opportunity, to go through any other
interviews that they have, or be able to really decide which position, if they’ve
been given multiple offers, which a lot of Miami students do receive. This gives
them the opportunity to really think about which offer is going to be right
for them. Students in the Farmer School of Business there are a few other
timelines to consider. Because a lot of those students who have summer
internships, they will often lead to full-time positions. So that offer for
summer internships must remain open until October 15th. The summer leadership
experience, which for our accounting students will most likely lead to
an internship, that offer must remain open until August 15. And then you have
full-time internship for fall recruiting and spring recruiting again here for
these it’s either a by specific date or three weeks,
whichever one would be longer. So those are a lot of dates, but again those
policies are located on both the Career Center and the Farmer School of Business
website. So as your students are starting to look
for internships and jobs, it’s good to have a couple of places to start. So we
encourage all of the students to create a LinkedIn profile early on in their
years here at Miami, and we can actually have a great search engine right there
in the site for job and internships. And you can sort that by level, you can sort
that by location, it really is very helpful. And we know that those those
postings are usually from a company that students are following, so they already
have an interest in those. You can also likely see who posted that position and
so students can follow that person on LinkedIn, perhaps even reach out to that
person on LinkedIn to inquire about the position. If your students have any
interest in looking at international opportunities, Going Global is another
option for students to get started and we do have a subscription to that here
through the Career Center. Handshake, of course, is our online job board and so
all of the companies that are posting on handshake, whether it be for jobs or
internships, go through a process here in the Career Center and we make sure that
they are vetted before that they’re posting both live. So we know that all
the postings on handshake will be great experiences or opportunities for our
students. Indeed.com is one that we use often
here in the Career Center and there are lots of opportunities there. However we
always encourage students to make sure you do your research and look for the
company’s website, and perhaps the job posting on the company’s website, in
addition to looking on Indeed. And then we also have an AngelList, which is a
great resource for those students who are looking to go into the startup
community. So a lot of those startups may not be
posting on some of the bigger sites or even on handshake, but they will be on
the AngelList, so it’s great for the startup community. I also want to say
that again it is good to have students do research, so not just looking on these
sites but going to the company sites specifically and looking up information
about them. And we talk about that a lot in the basic interviewing skills
workshop, talking about how to do that type of research. And as students are
looking for positions, tell them that it is ok to apply for multiple positions at
a time. You never know what the interest is going to be in that position and it
could be a long time before you hear about a position. So applying for
multiple positions at one time is okay and is encouraged. Here is some more
specific information about Handshake, this is the main tool that we use here
on campus to communicate with students about jobs and internships, amongst other
things here happening in the Career Center. So this is a picture of the cards
that we are passing out in our office with information to students about how
to log in so that way they can apply for those jobs and internships. They can also
use this to research organizations and employers that are coming to all of our
career fair and expo events. We also have all of our workshops and info sessions
that are posted on Handshake. Students can see a list of all of those. And we’ve
started something new this year called our Career Clusters, and so we are
looking at all of our workshops and sessions that we offer and we are
connecting them with a Career Cluster, along with our employers. That is going
to take us some time to make sure that we can label all of those, but we are in
the process of that. And so when your students choose their career cluster,
they can then go into Handshake and search that they want to attend an event
that is in the Health and Medicine cluster, for
example, and that would be able to pull all of those up. So Handshake is a great
way just to see what is happening. This is also how they would schedule their
mock and on-campus interviews, along with requesting their career coaching
appointments. So this tool that we have is a great tool for students to
really be connected to the Career Center and be able to do multiple career
related tasks in one place. So if you’re talking to your student about this, they
can access this through their myMiami page in the upper left hand corner. They
would see those circles: their BannerWeb, Careers, and the HUB. The careers there in
red is what they would choose and that would take them straight to the
Handshake page, where they can log in. You can also see our job board just by going
to our website, MiamiOH.edu/careers, and on the right hand side there,
you’ll see job board. And that’s what you would click to get to Handshake. So here
is a couple of items to note about networking. And so a lot of jobs and
interviews now are through networking and who you know, so talking a little bit
about informational interviewing and what that looks like. LinkedIn is a great
place to start. I always talk to students about utilizing our alumni network and
it’s very easy to find those alumni on LinkedIn. Great way to reach out to them
and explain that they are a student and wanting to get to know them a little bit
better. Another way then to do informational interviewing to learn about
organizations of interest, professional associations or our career fairs all of those are great
ways just to network and talk with folks. So if it is not going to be say, at an
event, but you want to take it a little step further, then this is where
informational interviewing comes into play. If you don’t know what
informational interviewing is, it’s essentially a conversation; meeting
with a potential job figure. So a student is looking for advice on their career or
their industry, and maybe the culture in a possible workplace, and this interview
is just used to gather information on the field, on the specific company that
they’re going to be visiting, And it also gives them an opportunity then to
network with the person that they’re going to be interviewing. So this
informational interviewing is different from a job interview, because this
conversation is not about hiring for a specific job. The student can ask just
general questions about the nature of the company or the industry, how the… how
the professional got to where they are. Perhaps they had connections to Miami
and then what other connections can be made through that meeting? So this
informational interview provides a non-threatening forum, essentially, for
discussion for both sides to learn about each other, but really for the student
just to get a bigger picture, a better idea as to what is happening in the
industry and what it’s like to be involved in that industry.
Also something to think about, if your student is going to be
participating in an informational interview, is to think about etiquette
and guidelines for that. Remember that for any interview, the students should
learn in advance about the industry, about the company, and even perhaps who
they will be meeting with. And that these interviews are typically very short, 15
to 20 minutes, just to ask a few general questions and make a connection. I think
a great time to do some informational interviewing is during the J-Term, where
students have the the extended winter break. Spring Break is also a time, or, of
course, anytime over the summer. But during those break periods is a good
time to do that. And this is good for students of all years, so even if your
student is a first-year student, it’s absolutely okay for them just to be
starting. And this kind of goes along with our philosophy of Career
Exploration and talking with professionals in
in the industry. So again, good for all students. Great thing to do over long
breaks. Here is a sample ask for a student to send the either via email, or
perhaps a LinkedIn message, explaining that they would like to have an
informational interview. So the first part is really just an introduction and
the interest that they currently have in particular industry. Students will then
go on to say how they learned of that professional, the position that they’re
in, and why they’re reaching out to them. Perhaps what they’re interested in
learning about. And then the ask to to meet with them to learn about how they
developed their career: what was their career path? How did their major equal career?
Things like that, and then, of course, just thank you for considering the request. So
again, you can send this via email or a LinkedIn message. Something to consider
if your student may not have a high GPA and you’re concerned about, what that
will mean as far as applying for different internships and jobs. So there
are things that students can put on their resume that can really sell their
experiences and the skills that they’ve learned while being here at Miami. So we
encourage students when they are creating the resume to also think about
what they can bring outside of their coursework; the different experiences
that they’ve had. A different experience could include a study abroad experience.
There are a lot of skills that students gain by doing experiential learning
opportunities. Skills are also really important, and specifically, I’m talking
about our NACE skills, which is the National Association of Colleges and
Employers. The top five skills that employers are looking for include
problem-solving, ability to work in a team, communication (both written and
oral), leadership, and strong work ethic. Those are just the top five. There’s
quite a long list, but students being able to speak to those skills, perhaps in
a cover letter or during a phone interview, could allow an employer to see
that they have skills that would be applicable to a job that, you know… And
they don’t have to worry about their GPA. It’s also about who you know and if they
can vouch for you. So if a student has had another work experience, or it can
get a great recommendation from a teacher, or has had a mentor that’s
already in the industry, those are just a few examples about utilizing that
network. Again, that’s why we encourage students to start their LinkedIn profile
early and build their networks, so they can really get to know folks that are in
the industry, and then would be able to talk with
others about possible opportunities for jobs and internships. And of course we
want students to understand employers; what is it exactly the employer is
looking for. Some employers don’t care what the GPA was, they want to know that
you have these skills and experiences that are going to make you be in a good
employee for them. So we want your students to be prepared for the
interview, and there’s a couple of ways that we can do that. One of those is that
drop-in resume reviews with our career assistants, and I mentioned this earlier,
that these are our student employees who have been trained to help students with
their resume. And so we have these drop-in hours here at the Career Center,
where your students do not have to make an appointment. They just literally
drop-in and can talk with one of our career assistants. So we have students
here Monday through Friday, and our hours are listed there. Those are on
our website and I highly encourage all students to do at least one mock
interview while they are here at Miami. Remember, to do a mock interview you must
have completed the basic interviewing skills workshop, and then you make your
appointment on Handshake. And so we offer those mock
interviews here at the Career Center Monday through Thursday, from 8:00 to
8:0,0 and then also on Friday, from 8:00 to 5:00. And so all of those times and
availability is listed on Handshake and students would sign up that way. So, what’s next as we are beginning our
career journey here? First we want students to customize their Handshake
profile. You saw that there are many ways for students to engage with the Career
Center, all through handshake, and so employers can also engage with students
that way. Students can apply for jobs directly through Handshake, so having an
updated Handshake profile, including a professional picture along with their
resume uploaded and anything else that they would like to share. They can
customize that. This is one of the goals that we have for all of our students is
to have their Handshake profile updated. Build – of course this is the network
that we’ve been talking about, so conducting informational interviews,
start that LinkedIn profile, and building your network. Update the resume and
LinkedIn profile. These are both active… active documents that we want students
to continuously update every semester. Things are happening so fast with
classes and projects and experiences and it’s easier just to update it at the end
of every semester to keep it current. Lots of ways to attend events through
the Career Center, whether it be employer sessions, career fairs and events,
workshops, so we have lots of different types of events and programming that
happens through our office. And students are attend… are welcome to attend as many
of those as they would like. Practice – Again that mock interview, making sure
that students have completed the basic interviewing skills workshops prior to
that mock interview. The basic interviewing skills workshop is just a
one-time requirement. After they do that one time,
they can then do mock interviews and on-campus interviews as many as they
would like. And lastly, Logistics – thinking about once
you have received that internship offer, if it’s not going to be near home, what
does that look like? Is that going to require that you find your own housing
do they provide housing? Is it paid, is it unpaid? And those are all things that the
career advisors can help with and helping students figure out what the next steps
would be once they’ve accepted an offer. So now would be a great time if you have
any questions regarding the job and internship search. [no sound] So first question is
if a student gets an internship on their own, do they work with the Career Center
for getting academic credit? So students would actually go through their
department to get their academic credit. There would be a specific course number
the students would need to register for to get that credit. If they don’t know
who to talk to within their department, their career advisor could probably
point them in the right direction. And they would need to make sure that
they register for that course to get the credit before they start their
internship. [no sound] So the next question: Any specific
recommendation for nonprofit internships? We have a number of students that
participate in nonprofit internships each year. I don’t know if you have a
specific question about how to apply for those, but I can tell you that even
through the Career Center, we do offer scholarships, because a lot of times
those nonprofit internships are unpaid. So we offer scholarships to help
students be able to do those types of internships. A lot of times the
nonprofit’s can be smaller, and so they may not be posted on Handshake per se,
but students can do some individual research and career advisors can help
with doing that type of research and knowing where to look. There are certain
job boards too for nonprofits. I know of one specifically in Cincinnati. So again,
your students can work with the career advisor for their division: “I’m looking
for these types of internships.” So the next question: We… I was asked to repeat
the five NACE skills, and so I’ll try to say this a little bit slower. And the
first one is problem-solving. Second one is ability to work in a team. Third one is communication. Fourth skill is leadership. And the fifth one is strong work ethic.
And if you want to know more about those skills and what the other ones that the
employers are looking for… if you were to search ‘NACE skills 2018,’
you would be able to see that full list. There would be an article there
that would contain all of those for you. And another question is about speak more
about unpaid internships, in that unpaid… We think all students should be paid for
the work that they do. They are in a professional… excuse me professional
atmosphere. They are doing work for a company, and so it is our… our… it is what
we would like for students to have a paid experience for that. So we do look
on Handshake and when those internships are being posted, there is a place for
students to see if it is compensated or not. Sometimes the internships that are
not paid, they in-turn do get some type of stipend for travel or maybe housing is
provided. So even though it may not say that there’s a specific compensation, I
would encourage your students to ask about location assistance, or housing or
anything like that, as well. But again, we don’t encourage students to to have an
unpaid internship, because we do want them to be considered a professional
while they are there doing that work. [no sound] The next question is What percentage of
students do at least one internship? I don’t have that specific number in
front of me right now, but that is something that I could look up for you.
Again also I can only give you the information that we have via Handshake.
A lot of our students do get internships on their own and we never know about
that. So I will do some research on that and I will pass that along to… along
to Mark, and he can make sure that that information gets passed along to
you. Next: Can you help students out-of-state
students get internships out-of-state? Yes we can. We actually have a great
employer relations team, who are continuously building the relationships
that we have with employers throughout the United States.
We actually have a majority of our students who stay in Ohio when it comes
to career, but the next states that come to mind are New York, California, Illinois.
And so we are… we are building those relationships with employers out of
state. So I would encourage your students to set up a time with their career
advisor to talk about how to navigate the best way to be looking for jobs that
are out of state. Also Handshake is a great tool, in that a lot of different
universities use that platform for their jobs.
So when employers go in to Handshake to post their job, they have the option
to post that job at multiple universities, whoever uses Handshake. And
so we are starting to see more and more positions being posted that are out of
state because Handshake is being used by a wide variety of universities across
the country. [no sound] We have a question about marketing
specific: how many do internships after the sophomore year or is it more after
the junior year? I can’t say specifically for marketing, I can just say in general,
that employers are wanting to engage students sooner rather than later.
And so it was typical that students had the first internship experience after
the junior year, however I would say that that has been pushed back to after the
sophomore year and even first years… after that first… that first year,
students are going out and doing a lot of informational interviews, they’re
volunteering, doing some week-long job shadows. But for the first paid
internship, I would say after the sophomore year is becoming more and more
popular. Some students are doing that even after the first year. It really
depends on their experience level, the connections that they’ve made, and what
opportunities that they know of. [no sound] Are there any other questions? [no sound] Well thank you all very much for joining
us today. I want to let you know that the slides and the recording will be sent
within a couple of days. And if you do have any other future questions, you can
send an email to the Career Center. There is the general Career Center
email address, if you would like to forward any questions or concerns, or you
can also contact Mark in the Parent and Family Programs Office. Thanks again for
joining us today.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *